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    Bubbles in Vinyl Floors

    Sunday, June 13, 2010, 4:09 PM Views: 1705
    Posted By: WD-40 Job Site

    No matter how well a vinyl floor is installed, bubbles can appear days, weeks or even years after installation. This is because moist air rises from below and gets trapped under the surface, causing a bubble. Here is the secret for removing bubbles in vinyl flooring: For small bubbles, an inch or less in diameter, use a large needle to prick the bubble, allowing the trapped air to escape. Then use a towel and a hot iron to heat and flatten the vinyl. Use a stack of books to weight it down until it rebounds. For larger bubbles, use a towel and iron first and carefully cut an X with a sharp razor knife. Pull back the triangle cuts and add floor adhesive. Press the cuts back in place and weight it down. Be sure to put down a sheet of waxed paper first so you don't wind up with a stack of books glued in place in the middle of your floor.

    Bubbles in Vinyl Floors
    Submitted by Users to WD-40 JobSite

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    Removing Plaster

    Sunday, June 13, 2010, 4:07 PM Views: 1015
    Posted By: WD-40 Job Site

    If you have a project that involves removing plaster, you'll be dealing with plenty of chunks of the stuff. If you undertake such a project, be prepared for lots of work and mess. Depending on how old your home is, plaster will either be applied over lath (wood strips) or directly onto drywall. Using a hammer, make a hole to see which you have. If it's on drywall, pull off chunks as you go. For lath, saw up and down studs first, then pry. Watch for electric wires and pipes when sawing, and be prepared to handle lots of heavy, messy debris.

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    Hanging New Ceiling Fixtures?

    Sunday, June 13, 2010, 4:05 PM Views: 948
    Posted By: WD-40 Job Site

    The placement of ceiling fixtures can be a pain when you hit a joist or when stuff falls in your face. It's an aggravating task because when you cut a hole from down below you don't know what you'Re going to find up above. To avoid having to relocate your placement (once you've cut a big hole and discovered an obstacle that says "not here, my friend, try again"), drill a small test hole first -- centered where you'd like your fixture to go -- and push a piece of coat-hanger wire up into the hole. Then go to the attic and locate the probe. If it's OK joist-wise, clear away any insulation and other debris, and continue cutting the hole from down below. If it needs minor correction, you easily can make it. Repairing a small test drill hole is far easier than patching a large gaping hole that's in the wrong place.

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    Cutting a Ceiling Hole

    Sunday, June 13, 2010, 4:04 PM Views: 947
    Posted By: WD-40 Job Site

    First, mark out the cut lines from below, then drill up through the ceiling at various points. Then, saw through the ceiling from above (following the drill- hole guides), while an assistant stands on a ladder below holding a large cardboard box against the ceiling to catch the dust as it falls.

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    Pointing - Caring for Bricks

    Sunday, June 13, 2010, 4:03 PM Views: 1372
    Posted By: WD-40 Job Site

    Brick is a very popular material. However, over time, the mortar that holds bricks together can become cracked or loose due to aging and settling of the house. That's when it's time for "pointing." Brick pointing is the process wherein you remove and replace any damaged or missing mortar between the bricks. First, chip away any cracked or loose mortar with a chisel and hammer. Be careful not to damage the bricks. Then sweep it off with a brush. Brush on the joints with water, so dry bricks don't draw the moisture out of the mortar. Then squish it in place with a mason's trowel -- vertical joints first, then horizontal, removing the excess and shaping it with a jointer.

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    Hole-Free Picture Hanging

    Sunday, June 13, 2010, 4:01 PM Views: 1006
    Posted By: WD-40 Job Site

    For hole-free walls, here's what to do. Before you get to hammering on a paper wall, cut a small V right where you want your picture hook; then wet it down, peel back the V and pound in your nail or hook. Then, when you're ready to take it down, dampen the V and smooth it back. If you want to skip holes altogether, hang your stuff from up above with fishing line. It's almost invisible. And if you're going to hang a whole bunch of things, lay them all out on the floor on paper first. Then hold them up and do the above right where you want them.

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    Repairing a Hollow-Core Door

    Sunday, June 13, 2010, 3:59 PM Views: 1884
    Posted By: WD-40 Job Site

    If the doors in your home are hollow, chances are you've had to, or will have to, repair a hole in a door. Simply cut out the damaged area in the shape of a square. A razor knife and small rat-tail saw will work nicely. Next, cut a piece of backer board from quarter-inch plywood that is a couple of inches larger than the opening -- in both directions. You'll need to cut the backer board in half to get it into the hole. Apply a bead of glue to the face of the backer board and place it against the inside face of the door. Use a few drywall screws to secure the material. Once the glue has dried, remove the screws and cut a piece of eighth-inch plywood into the exact dimensions of the square hole. Set it in the hole and it should fit over the backer board flush with the door. Glue the patch into place, putty, sand and paint.

    Repairing a Hollow-Core Door
    Submitted by Users to WD-40 JobSite

    1 1

    Quiet a Squeaky Floor

    Sunday, June 13, 2010, 3:56 PM Views: 1937
    Posted By: WD-40 Job Site

    If you have floors that squeak, here is a quick tip that will quiet things down without muss or fuss. If the squeak is between the sub and finished floors and you can get at it from down below, drill a small hole only through the sub floor just slightly bigger than the nozzle of a spray can of foam insulation. Then insert the nozzle of the spray foam and inject a small dollop of foam. When it hardens, it'll stop any movement between the floors and the annoying squeak. Just be sure to set something heavy on the finished floor above until the foam hardens and cures a bit.

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    Caulk Saver

    Sunday, June 13, 2010, 3:49 PM Views: 1546
    Posted By: WD-40 Job Site

    After using a caulk gun, rather that throwing a half empty tube of caulk because it will dry up, do the following. Screw an electrical wire nut fastener on the end of the caulk tube. This will keep the caulk from drying up, and the next time you use it, it will be like new.

    Caulk Saver
    Submitted by Users to WD-40 JobSite

     

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    Slick Clean Up

    Sunday, June 13, 2010, 12:45 PM Views: 1007
    Posted By: WD-40 Job Site

    Having a hard time cleaning your hands after working on the car or lawnmower? Try this tip. Before you start work apply, hand cream to your hands, and be sure to get around your fingernails. You will be surprised how easy your hands clean up when you are done.

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